Kristina Shull

Kristina Shull

Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History
Kristina Shull
Kristina Shull is a public historian and interdisciplinary scholar specializing in race, foreign relations, immigration control, and prison privatization in the modern United States. She received her Ph.D. in History from UC Irvine. Her book manuscript, Invisible Bodies: Immigration Crisis and Private Prisons Since the Reagan Era, explores the concurrent rise of immigration detention and prison privatization in the early 1980s at the intersections of Cold War nationalism and growing public xenophobia after the Vietnam War. It illustrates the mutually constitutive relationship between migration and foreign policy, and the immigrant detention center as a transnational, imperial space. The book concludes that limiting the visibility of migrant populations was an integral part of Reagan’s rightward shift from a “welfare” to a “warfare” state during this time, as many of the enforcement structures established to address a perceived immigration crisis and to silence opposition movements further accelerated the rise of mass incarceration. Shull is the creator of IMM Print and Climate Refugee Stories; in 2016 she was awarded a Soros Justice Fellowship from the Open Society Foundations for her work in immigration detention storytelling.
 
Shull teaches courses on race and mass incarceration, US and the World, Cold War culture, climate change, and migration. In the Fall of 2018, she taught the seminar “Detention, Deportation, and Resistance in US History,” and in the Fall of 2019 she will teach “Climate Migration: Histories, Borders, and Activism” in Harvard University's department of Ethnicity, Migration, and Rights. In August of 2020, she will join the History Department at UNC Charlotte as Assistant Professor of Post-1960 US History.
 

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Emerson Hall, 4th Floor
25 Quincy St
Cambridge MA 02138

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