Juliet Nebolon

Juliet Nebolon

Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History
Nebolon photo
Juliet Nebolon is an interdisciplinary scholar of race, indigeneity, and gender in the history of U.S. empire, with a particular focus on U.S. war and military expansion in Asia and the Pacific Islands.  She received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University.  Her book manuscript, Settler Militarism: World War II in Hawai‘i and the Making of Transpacific Empire, focuses on the martial law period in Hawai‘i during the Pacific War.  This project explores the overlapping regimes of settler colonialism and militarization in the domains of public health, domestic science, education, land acquisition, and transpacific internment.  Her article, “‘Life Given Straight from the Heart’: Settler Militarism, Biopolitics, and Public Health in Hawai‘i during World War II,” was published in American Quarterly
 
Nebolon teaches courses on the United States and the World; Asian American Studies; Pacific Studies; and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.  In Spring 2019, she will teach the seminar, “Race, Gender, and U.S. Militarism.”
 

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